Cruiser style WATTMAN electric motorcycle billed as most powerful in world

Finally, a “Cruiser” styled electric motorcycle, though it’s still not the kind of cruiser bike I want (hint: my gas bike is a Honda Rebel 250).  Anyway, Voxan Motors has unveiled the WATTMAN at the Paris Motorcycle Show. 

Details are slim:  200 horsepower, 200 Nm of torque, up to 10,500 RPM, 0-160 km/hr in 5.9 seconds (0-100 miles/hr).  It sports a permanent magnet liquid cooled motor.

These make them claim it’s the most powerful electric motorcycle in existence.    We can think of a few organizations that would like to contest such a claim.

The 12.8 kilowatt-hour battery pack is said to give a 120 mile riding range.  But, interpolating that from spec’s of other bikes, I suspect this range figure is at city streets speeds rather than highway speeds or racing speeds.  Charging time is 80% in less than 30 minutes thanks to support of the SAE DC Fast Charging system – but the problem there is the scarcity of compatible charging stations.

Evade blocked charging stations with one of these handy J1772 extension cords.

Sponsored

This bike is clearly NOT aimed at racing.   Instead the company says the WATTMAN is “Primarily intended for an exclusive international clientele seeking innovation” and that production will be limited to “unit-by-unit, upon order, and hand-assembled in France, at the Solesmes (Sarthe) Electric Vehicle Manufacture.”  In other words, this may never see anything other than the garages of rich men.

More ABOUT VOXAN on http://www.voxan.com

About David Herron

David Herron is a writer and software engineer living in Silicon Valley. He primarily writes about electric vehicles, clean energy systems, climate change, peak oil and related issues. When not writing he indulges in software projects and is sometimes employed as a software engineer. David has written for sites like PlugInCars and TorqueNews, and worked for companies like Sun Microsystems and Yahoo.

About David Herron

David Herron is a writer and software engineer living in Silicon Valley. He primarily writes about electric vehicles, clean energy systems, climate change, peak oil and related issues. When not writing he indulges in software projects and is sometimes employed as a software engineer. David has written for sites like PlugInCars and TorqueNews, and worked for companies like Sun Microsystems and Yahoo.

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