Tesla Model S

The word for a Tesla Model S hogging an EV Charging spot? Musked?

Electric car drivers must have access to electric vehicle charging spots.  That means we, the community of electric vehicle drivers, have developed an etiquette for sharing charging station access.  Not everyone knows or follows the etiquette, making for friction and anger.

Usually it’s a gasoline car blocking access to a charging station.  The word for this is – that the station is ICE’d.  ICE being Internal Combustion Engine.

But what’s the term we use when a Tesla Model S is blocking access to a charging station?

This group of Volt drivers decided upon the word – “Musked”

What one supposes is that this Model S driver saw “Oh, here’s an electric car parking spot – what a nice perk” and parked in the spot even though they weren’t planning to charge their car.

The problem with this is these are not a parking spots, these are charging spots.  Those spaces are supposed to be reserved for the act of charging an electric car.

Another problem is that public electric car charging infrastructure is positioned as a “parking lot” model of usage, rather than the “filling station” model.  That’s because of the charging time required for Level 2 charging – several hours for a full recharge.  The filling station model (in-and-out in 5-10 minutes) doesn’t work when it takes several hours to refuel the car.

In any case – Model S, parked in an EV charging space, but not plugged in – Musked is the word.  Tell all your friends.

That leaves the question of the word for a Leaf, or Volt, or Plug-in Prius, parked in an EV charging space and not plugged in.  This does happen, it’s not just gasoline car or Model S drivers that are at fault.  Not all the electric vehicle owners have learned the etiquette.  Tell all your friends about the etiquette, as well.

About David Herron

David Herron is a writer and software engineer living in Silicon Valley. He primarily writes about electric vehicles, clean energy systems, climate change, peak oil and related issues. When not writing he indulges in software projects and is sometimes employed as a software engineer. David has written for sites like PlugInCars and TorqueNews, and worked for companies like Sun Microsystems and Yahoo.

About David Herron

David Herron is a writer and software engineer living in Silicon Valley. He primarily writes about electric vehicles, clean energy systems, climate change, peak oil and related issues. When not writing he indulges in software projects and is sometimes employed as a software engineer. David has written for sites like PlugInCars and TorqueNews, and worked for companies like Sun Microsystems and Yahoo.

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