CHAdeMO’s European death sentence commuted thanks to its standardisation

Some good news for CHAdeMO in Europe is that the European Union has adopted a draft proposal supporting the “Dual Standard Approach”.  While the Directive requires that all DC Fast Charging infrastructure support the Combo Charging System, through the EN62196-2 plug, it allows such charging stations to also support CHAdeMO.  The Directive acknowledges that some EU countries have already spent quite a bit on CHAdeMO fast charging infrastructure.

Rather, it says “have already invested in the deployment of other standardised technologies”.  Teasing that phrase apart we see that when the IEC accepted CHAdeMO as a standardised way of electric car fast charging, the door opened to EU approval of CHAdeMO use.

That makes one wonder out loud what will happen to the Tesla Supercharger system in Europe.  I understand that in Europe, Tesla supports a different plug for Supercharging than is used in the U.S.  Hurm..

Anyway, this is a nice change from the story circulating a few months ago that the EU was going to outright BAN CHAdeMO in Europe.  (See my writeup on PlugInCars)

The CHAdeMO Association had this to say:

The European Parliament has adopted today with overwhelming support the final draft for the Directive on the deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure1. CHAdeMO Association welcomes the decision by Europe to endorse the dual-standard approach to DC fast charging. By clearly recognizing “multistandard recharging” and protecting the interest of the first-mover EV drivers as well as Member States, EU has aligned the legislation with the present state of the market and left the door open for future evolutions.”

“The recital2 of this directive clearly advocates that existing EVs shall continue to be able to charge, and that the existing infrastructure remain in operation without retrofitting or any arbitrary “transitional period.” CHAdeMO appreciates this as a clear recognition of the over 1,000 CHAdeMO chargers currently in operation in Europe, servicing 36,000 users every day.”

Sources: EU DirectiveInsideEV’s

About David Herron

David Herron is a writer and software engineer living in Silicon Valley. He primarily writes about electric vehicles, clean energy systems, climate change, peak oil and related issues. When not writing he indulges in software projects and is sometimes employed as a software engineer. David has written for sites like PlugInCars and TorqueNews, and worked for companies like Sun Microsystems and Yahoo.

About David Herron

David Herron is a writer and software engineer living in Silicon Valley. He primarily writes about electric vehicles, clean energy systems, climate change, peak oil and related issues. When not writing he indulges in software projects and is sometimes employed as a software engineer. David has written for sites like PlugInCars and TorqueNews, and worked for companies like Sun Microsystems and Yahoo.

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