Nissan’s zero-emissions zero-fatalaties pledge includes autonomous driving by 2020

Nissan as well as Tesla Motors is pledging to develop autonomous driving.  In Nissan’s case the pledge is to develop a “commercially viable” autonomous driving system by 2020 and to marry this with their pledge for zero emissions.  The two pledges together are “zero emissions” and “zero fatalities”.  The technology is being developed in partnership with research teams at Universities.

Conspicuous is the absence of Google’s self-driving car team in the list of partners.  In a video interview Nissan EVP Andy Palmer talks about their roadmap differing from Google’s in that Google is requiring a “connected car” where Nissan believes that autonomous driving should be accomplished completely by equipment carried on-board the vehicle.

Both Nissan and Tesla have rejected the idea to work with Google’s team.  Hurm.

The major step they’re taking at this moment is to construct a proving ground containing an array of semi-fake buildings to look like a typical town-scape.  The idea is to test the vehicle within real conditions, but not by driving around on public streets.

I’m collecting information over on GreenTransportation.info:  Nissan’s plan for an autonomous cars

In the video’s Andy Palmer pledges that autonomous driving will be rolled out across their entire product line within two complete product life-cycles after 2020.  I don’t think he means two product years, because each vehicle undergoes major revisions every 3-5 years.  I think he means that within two of those cycles every Nissan vehicle will adopt autonomous driving.  Meaning, they’ll have it by 2030ish.

Under the hood is an array of sensors and cameras and computerized processing units.

There are laser imaging systems all the way around, a camera and RADAR facing forward, and a “control unit.”

This is what the various sensors see.

 

About David Herron

David Herron is a writer and software engineer living in Silicon Valley. He primarily writes about electric vehicles, clean energy systems, climate change, peak oil and related issues. When not writing he indulges in software projects and is sometimes employed as a software engineer. David has written for sites like PlugInCars and TorqueNews, and worked for companies like Sun Microsystems and Yahoo.

About David Herron

David Herron is a writer and software engineer living in Silicon Valley. He primarily writes about electric vehicles, clean energy systems, climate change, peak oil and related issues. When not writing he indulges in software projects and is sometimes employed as a software engineer. David has written for sites like PlugInCars and TorqueNews, and worked for companies like Sun Microsystems and Yahoo.

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  1. Pingback: Nissan’s IDS self driving concept car promises perfect future that may never happen | The Long Tail Pipe

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