DIY solar charging units let’s you build portable power your way

Carrying a solar panel to recharge portable electronics devices is compelling, because it offers things like unlimited talk time or the ability to go hiking far from cities while still powering your gizmos. What if you cannot find a solar panel charging unit that fits your exact needs? Thanks to the fine folks at Voltaic you won’t be stuck, because they offer DIY kits for building solar charging units the way you want it.

Voltaic is famous for a line of backpacks with built-in solar panels. Their DIY solar charging kits use the same components, which you can buy individually and connect together in the way you want, or embed the components into the object of your choosing.

An example shown on the Voltaic website is a Kayak with a solar panel strapped to the top deck.

The company offers kits supplying 6 volts, 12 volts or 18 volts, in power ranges from 2 watts to 16 watts. Additional components are portable battery packs, and a wide selection of adapter cables for nearly any conceivable use. Their adapter cables includes one to plug into Mac MagSafe power sockets.

Selecting the components you desire is as simple as choosing the specific size of solar panel, any portable battery pack, or cables for your needs. The most difficult part is to know what size of solar panel is required for the task you have in mind. However, the site is full of guidance to help you choose the correct panel.

Source: http://www.voltaicsystems.com/kits.shtml

About David Herron

David Herron is a writer and software engineer living in Silicon Valley. He primarily writes about electric vehicles, clean energy systems, climate change, peak oil and related issues. When not writing he indulges in software projects and is sometimes employed as a software engineer. David has written for sites like PlugInCars and TorqueNews, and worked for companies like Sun Microsystems and Yahoo.
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About David Herron

David Herron is a writer and software engineer living in Silicon Valley. He primarily writes about electric vehicles, clean energy systems, climate change, peak oil and related issues. When not writing he indulges in software projects and is sometimes employed as a software engineer. David has written for sites like PlugInCars and TorqueNews, and worked for companies like Sun Microsystems and Yahoo.

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