SURVEY: Are electric car charging networks gouging the customers=? What’s the right fee to pay?

The question of whether Blink is gouging its customers, or not, raises a set of questions in my mind.  Is that really what Blink is doing?  Do the majority of EV drivers really think Blink is gouging them?  What about the other charging networks?  Maybe what I’m seeing is just the sour grapes of a few noisy people on Facebook, and everyone else is satisfied with Blink?

I don’t really believe that last point, but surely you agree that we need to find out.  This also gives me a chance to try out a service for embedding polls in blog posts.  I’m going to embed several polls in this post that together will act as an open survey/questionnaire.

Maybe, together, we can get to the bottom of what the charging station networks should do to be fair.

Now that we have that out of the way, what about the other charging station networks?

It seems there should be a fee, of some kind, to use an electric car charging station.  If nothing else, fees discourage squatting.

But let’s first try to understand how long the typical charging session lasts.  That will give us context for understanding the fee per hour or per kilowatt.

Now let’s talk about the fee per unit of time or kilowatt hours.

And, what are you currently paying?

Since we’re focusing on Blink, how good is their service?

This is the last question. There are lots of charging networks available, but which are the most popular?

There we go.  Hopefully this will be of use to all of us …  Have fun with the questions, and if you like them please share the survey with your friends.  If you have suggestions let me know in the comment box below.

About David Herron

David Herron is a writer and software engineer living in Silicon Valley. He primarily writes about electric vehicles, clean energy systems, climate change, peak oil and related issues. When not writing he indulges in software projects and is sometimes employed as a software engineer. David has written for sites like PlugInCars and TorqueNews, and worked for companies like Sun Microsystems and Yahoo.

About David Herron

David Herron is a writer and software engineer living in Silicon Valley. He primarily writes about electric vehicles, clean energy systems, climate change, peak oil and related issues. When not writing he indulges in software projects and is sometimes employed as a software engineer. David has written for sites like PlugInCars and TorqueNews, and worked for companies like Sun Microsystems and Yahoo.

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